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Resources for GMAT Preparation and MBA Admissions

Austin GMAT Review offers the best GMAT prep course in Central Texas. Our goal for you, our student, is to not only achieve your best possible GMAT score, but also win admission into the business school of your choice.  Here we offer information and news for prospective GMAT test-takers and MBA candidates.

By Ajay Amar, Ph.D., Nov 11 2016 06:02PM

Happy Veterans Day! My military students sometimes joke that my GMAT course may be tough, but hey, it’s no Ranger School. Having taken on extremely challenging training and circumstances, it’s no surprise that military students and veterans bring dedication and resolve to the not-always-easy pursuit of a high GMAT score. As a teacher, I am proud to serve those who serve our country.


For this Veterans Day, we asked two of our former GMAT students from the U.S. Army – Nicole, a former current operations officer and project manager now studying at Yale School of Management, and Steve, a captain and former company commander who is currently pursuing his MBA at Emory University's Goizueta Business School – to share their advice on pursuing admission to top MBA programs while in the military. Whether you’re in the military or not, I think that their perspectives are of value to all of us.


By Ajay Amar, Ph.D., Aug 16 2016 09:00AM

People just starting their GMAT preparation often ask me what book I most recommend. With all the books on the market, and all the marketing hype, I understand why people are confused. I suspect that they hope there’s a confidential manual used by the Secret League of GMAT Gurus (SLOGG), and I’ll break the SLOGG Code of Silence. Well, there’s no need for secrecy: The Official Guide for GMAT Review is the best book for your GMAT preparation. I’ll even go a step further – if you value your time, don’t waste it on other books.


I use The Official Guide for GMAT Review 2016 (OG 2016) as the main reference book for Austin GMAT Review’s GMAT course. However, the book is not perfect. Read on for my overall assessment.


By Ajay Amar, Ph.D., Mar 29 2016 04:59PM

After you take the GMAT, you have an important decision to make – accept the GMAT score, or cancel it? You used to have to make the decision in two minutes or less, but as of March 10, 2016, you have a full 72 hours after your test to decide whether to cancel the score. If you cancel the score, it will not appear on your official GMAT score report – not even as a “C” for “Cancel.”


Your choices now are:


2 Minutes After Your Test – With a preview of your GMAT score in front of you, you decide to keep or cancel the score.


Up to 72 Hours After Your Test – If you kept the GMAT score at the test center, you may still cancel your score online (for a small fee).


Up to Four Years and 11 Months After Your Test – If you previously cancelled your GMAT score, you may reinstate your score online (for another fee).


Two years ago, immediately after taking the exam, you would have had to guess what your score might be, and decide to keep or cancel the score right there on the spot. GMAC’s more flexible policy is a significant improvement that should ease some of the pressure on test-takers. That said, I urge you to prepare in advance to make that big decision: Keep or Cancel?


By Ajay Amar, Ph.D., Feb 24 2016 04:08PM

Since 1996, the GMAT scores at Top 10 business schools have risen by 58 points, on the average. Is that escalation likely to continue, or are we nearing the end of the ride? I believe it's the latter. Here are some reasons that the factors that have pushed up GMAT scores are beginning to lose steam.


By Ajay Amar, Ph.D., Feb 2 2016 05:08PM

When I started Austin GMAT Review in 2008, I urged my students to study hard and break into “The 700 Club.” Today, the goals are higher. Although a 700 GMAT score will still open doors at most business schools, for the schools that regularly appear at the top of the rankings, 720+ would be better.


For you who are just starting out your GMAT studies with your eye on a Top 10 school, this is probably daunting news. The GMAT is already a high-stakes exam without additional pressure. In this article, I take a look at the trends that have pushed GMAT averages up and up and up.


By Ajay Amar, Ph.D., Nov 11 2015 09:00AM

Happy Veteran’s Day! I consider it to be one of my profession’s highest honors to serve those who serve our country. As a teacher, I am always impressed by the high degree of dedication my military students show in their GMAT studies, and apparently business schools are impressed, too. This year, according to the Military Times, almost 13% of students at MBA programs and other graduate school business programs came from the military.


That said, the MBA admissions process remains incredibly competitive. If you’re applying to business school while still in the military, your two main obstacles may be 1) achieving a high GMAT score in a non-academic environment not conducive to study, and 2) finding the business school that is the right “fit” for your non-business background.


With that in mind, we asked three former military students for their advice on tackling these two challenges.


By Ajay Amar, Ph.D., Jul 15 2015 06:58PM

Ginger, my former GMAT student, is headed to UT McCombs School of Business this August to start the Texas MBA program. As she wrote in this Facebook post, for her, time was in short supply: "A working mother of two energetic girls, I knew an MBA would greatly improve my ability to provide for my children while also setting an excellent example for them. But how could I manage studying for the GMAT, prepare the essays and application, and succeed at a demanding job, yet still be the parent I wanted to be? Well, I did it (woo hoo!), so you can, too!"


Here, in her own words, are Ginger's best tips for successfully preparing for the GMAT and applying to a top MBA program while juggling the demands of career and parenting.


By Ajay Amar, Ph.D., Mar 4 2015 05:37PM

It was 2012. The GMAT Integrated Reasoning (GMAT IR) section had just been launched to much fanfare by GMAC (the makers of the GMAT). Many test takers had rushed to take the exam before the GMAT IR was officially introduced: they feared trying to take on an unknown factor in the already rigorous test.


Then, one influential business school came right out and said … Don’t worry about it.






By Ajay Amar, Ph.D., Nov 4 2014 07:55PM

With few exceptions, the average GMAT score at top business schools has been slowly creeping up. Here are a few GMAT averages from the Class of 2016: Stanford, 732 average GMAT score, +2 points from 2011. Harvard, 726, +2. Wharton, 728, +8. Chicago Booth, 724, +5. NYU Stern, 721, +2. Kellogg, 717, +3. MIT Sloan, 713, +3. It’s not surprising that the anxiety levels of GMAT test-takers have also risen, and aren’t always relieved when that highly important score appears at the end of the test.


The question: Should I retake the GMAT? The answer: Maybe. Given the time that it takes to prepare for the GMAT exam and apply to schools, the decision to retake the GMAT is not made on a coin toss. Here are seven questions to consider – the answers will help you decide.


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