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Resources for GMAT Preparation and MBA Admissions

Austin GMAT Review offers the best GMAT prep course in Central Texas. Our goal for you, our student, is to not only achieve your best possible GMAT score, but also win admission into the business school of your choice.  Here we offer information and news for prospective GMAT test-takers and MBA candidates.

By Ajay Amar, Ph.D., Oct 17 2017 06:13PM


You are taking GMAT classes, and you’re completely focused on achieving a high GMAT score. Great! … However, I recommend that you also take time to attend MBA admissions events and information sessions in your area.


Here I offer a few tips for MBA admissions events provided by Elaine Conces, our VP of Graduate Programs, to not only help you make a good impression on the admissions gatekeepers, but also help you improve your applications. MBA events offer valuable opportunities to talk with admissions officers about their programs, so make the most of these rare occasions.


By Ajay Amar, Ph.D., Sep 27 2017 03:53PM


After you take the GMAT and achieve a solid score, it’s time to begin completing applications for your target business schools – including rounding up the people who will write your recommendation letters.


Admissions Committees want to hear from your current or former boss, and usually someone else who has observed you from a managerial standpoint. It’s never easy to start a conversation with, “Um, Boss, I am going to leave the company, and I would love for you to write the recommendation that allows me to do so.” Even if you have a supportive manager, or you plan to return, or you’re pursuing a part-time or executive-level program, you are still asking a big favor.


In the past, if you were applying to more than one business school, you had to ask an even bigger favor – “Will you write multiple recommendations for me?” Each school asked similar but different questions of recommenders, and often with different word counts and restrictions. One school might allow an entire recommendation letter to be submitted, while another might restrict the recommender to online boxes with strict word counts.


That was then, but luckily for you, this is now.


By Ajay Amar, Ph.D., Jul 10 2017 01:00PM



If you took the GMAT on or before July 10, 2017, you took the exam in the following order: Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA), Integrated Reasoning, Quantitative, and Verbal. Today, you have the choice to rearrange the exam sections more in an order to your preference. You may decide to start with the AWA section, or you may choose to begin with the Verbal or Quantitative sections. You will make the section order selection at the test center, just before you start the GMAT, so choose wisely.


The test requires four hours of intense concentration. Your ability to focus may peak anywhere from 30 minutes to 90 minutes, and as fatigue, hunger, or stress sets in, that focus may waiver. This is why I believe that the order of your exam sections might be used as a strategic advantage, if you go in prepared.


Here's my opinion on some simple strategies to adopt (and check back with me in a year, after I get more feedback from my students).


By Ajay Amar, Ph.D., Jun 6 2017 04:52PM


If you plan to apply to MBA programs this year, chances are that now you’re either studying hard for the GMAT, or you have just taken the exam and are ready to kick back and enjoy some leisure time. Whether you’re studying or slacking, summer is an excellent time to take a step beyond the GMAT. Yes, all you prospective applicants, it’s time to suit up and go out to meet school representatives.


The good news is that MBA admissions teams are traveling to Texas cities this summer. The bad news is that fewer out-of-state schools seem to be making Texas a destination this year. Your opportunities to meet with admissions officers are more limited. So, take advantage of every opportunity to make connections, and if you’re planning a summer get-away, you might want to make a road trip to visit your favorite school or schools.


While getting a great GMAT score helps demonstrate that you’re ready for rigorous classes, meeting school representatives is a good way to show them that you’re a class act all the way.


By Ajay Amar, Ph.D., May 2 2017 01:00PM


The makers of the GMAT devote parts of The Official Guide for GMAT Review to clarifying common misconceptions. For example, many test-takers believe, erroneously, that the first 10 questions of the exam count the most toward your final total score. (In actuality, the score is calculated from the difficulty of all of the questions that you answer; the exam's algorithm adjusts the level of difficulty as you go along.) This bad piece of advice, among many others, continues to be passed around on Internet forums, and the more that it's repeated, the more it's believed.


Where do these myths come from? Mostly from people's desire to discover a magic key to unlocking the exam's secrets, while reassuring themselves that they can beat the GMAT. And once repeated or copied without scrutiny by enough people on the forums, the myths attain a certain level of permanence.


Time to bust some insidious myths (other than the ones GMAC has already clarified). In this article, I debunk three myths that keep popping up more persistently than the Easter Bunny.